RVing 101

So you are thinking of taking the plunge and RVing?  Great!  Whether full-time or part-time there are some things you will need to make your experience even better.  Below we will go over what we consider “RVing 101”.  Gear we can recommend and tips we’ve learned from experience.

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MUST HAVE GEAR

Anderson levelers, in our opinion, are a must have.  We started out with the Camco leveling blocks (next item below) and while they work great it can be difficult to judge how high you need to go up.  With the Anderson levelers, you just keep backing up (or going forward based on where you place them) until you get to the desired height.  MUCH easier and quicker.  We recommend these that also include the rubber mat as it helps keep the levelers from sliding on slick surfaces.  Our wheels on our RV are really close together so I did have to modify our levelers by cutting a few inches off the thin side.  This was needed so we could get them between the wheels.  Not all will need to do this and it does not affect the warranty.

As stated above, we started out traveling with just one package of 10 of these Camco leveling blocks.  They work like Lego blocks and you stack them in a pyramid fashion and drive up onto them to level your RV.  They are very light weight and work well.  We didn’t like them as much for leveling because we would often need to drive off of them, add more blocks, and go through the process again.  Not a huge deal but let me tell you, if you’ve ever setup an RV in the pouring rain, every moment saved you take!  So, why recommend these if we don’t use them for leveling?  Well, we use them for our stabilizer jacks and tongue jack.  We actually bought another 10 pack so that we could not have to lower our stabilizers down as far.  They seem more stable if they aren’t extended as much.  So these are very tough, lightweight option for placing under your stabilizers or of course for leveling.

Water sources around the US can vary greatly in quality.  At the very minimum you should filter the water at the water source.  We have found these Camco in-line filters to work great and last for a long time.  We only replace every three months or so.  If staying in RV parks you just hook this to the water spigot and then hook your hose to it and run to your RV connection.  When boondocking, we still use this to filter the water being placed into our fresh tank and water jugs.

For water filtration inside the RV we use a Brita extra large pitcher.  Holds lots of water and is much, much cheaper than using bottled water.  It won’t fit in our RV fridge though, so we fill water bottles and place in our fridge for cold water.  Misty likes her water super cold and Jason prefers it just cool.

 

To save your city water connection on your RV, we highly recommend picking up one of these Camco hose elbows.  The fittings on the side of your RV are likely just plastic and over time the stress of having a water hose connected can cause them to crack.  These elbows help eliminate most of that stress.  A small price to pay for some added confidence!

We recently replaced our two, 25 foot water hoses, with this one 50 foot hose from Zero-G.  It is smaller, lighter and much easier to use than typical water hoses.  It is very will constructed too.  Should make rolling up the hose in cold weather much easier!

 

Another must have is a water pressure regulator.  Water pressure will vary greatly from place-to-place and sometimes it could potentially exceed the recommend pressure of the PEX tubing in your RV.  To be safe, you should get a good one like this one which allows you to adjust to the pressure as needed.  We started out with a simple 55psi regulator that we got with our RV but it started leaking and wasn’t adjustable.  This one does not leak and makes adjusting really easy.  A must have!

One of the more unpleasant items needed for the RV life is a sewer hose.  Whether you only use one at dump stations or if you need one continuously hooked up at a RV park, it is mandatory.  Hopefully you received one with your RV but if you did not, this is the kit we recommend.  The clear elbow, while gross, is needed so you can know when the tanks have stopped draining.  We also recommend getting another 10′ extension hose as well.  Many RV parks will have the sewer drain a bit too far for a single hose.

Levelers

Anderson levelers, in our opinion, are a must have.  We started out with the Camco leveling blocks (next item below) and while they work great it can be difficult to judge how high you need to go up.  With the Anderson levelers, you just keep backing up (or going forward based on where you place them) until you get to the desired height.  MUCH easier and quicker.  We recommend these that also include the rubber mat as it helps keep the levelers from sliding on slick surfaces.  Our wheels on our RV are really close together so I did have to modify our levelers by cutting a few inches off the thin side.  This was needed so we could get them between the wheels.  Not all will need to do this and it does not affect the warranty.

As stated above, we started out traveling with just one package of 10 of these Camco leveling blocks.  They work like Lego blocks and you stack them in a pyramid fashion and drive up onto them to level your RV.  They are very light weight and work well.  We didn’t like them as much for leveling because we would often need to drive off of them, add more blocks, and go through the process again.  Not a huge deal but let me tell you, if you’ve ever setup an RV in the pouring rain, every moment saved you take!  So, why recommend these if we don’t use them for leveling?  Well, we use them for our stabilizer jacks and tongue jack.  We actually bought another 10 pack so that we could not have to lower our stabilizers down as far.  They seem more stable if they aren’t extended as much.  So these are very tough, lightweight option for placing under your stabilizers or of course for leveling.

Fresh Water

Water sources around the US can vary greatly in quality.  At the very minimum you should filter the water at the water source.  We have found these Camco in-line filters to work great and last for a long time.  We only replace every three months or so.  If staying in RV parks you just hook this to the water spigot and then hook your hose to it and run to your RV connection.  When boondocking, we still use this to filter the water being placed into our fresh tank and water jugs.

For water filtration inside the RV we use a Brita extra large pitcher.  Holds lots of water and is much, much cheaper than using bottled water.  It won’t fit in our RV fridge though, so we fill water bottles and place in our fridge for cold water.  Misty likes her water super cold and Jason prefers it just cool.

 

To save your city water connection on your RV, we highly recommend picking up one of these Camco hose elbows.  The fittings on the side of your RV are likely just plastic and over time the stress of having a water hose connected can cause them to crack.  These elbows help eliminate most of that stress.  A small price to pay for some added confidence!

We recently replaced our two, 25 foot water hoses, with this one 50 foot hose from Zero-G.  It is smaller, lighter and much easier to use than typical water hoses.  It is very will constructed too.  Should make rolling up the hose in cold weather much easier!

 

Another must have is a water pressure regulator.  Water pressure will vary greatly from place-to-place and sometimes it could potentially exceed the recommend pressure of the PEX tubing in your RV.  To be safe, you should get a good one like this one which allows you to adjust to the pressure as needed.  We started out with a simple 55psi regulator that we got with our RV but it started leaking and wasn’t adjustable.  This one does not leak and makes adjusting really easy.  A must have!

RV Tanks

One of the more unpleasant items needed for the RV life is a sewer hose.  Whether you only use one at dump stations or if you need one continuously hooked up at a RV park, it is mandatory.  Hopefully you received one with your RV but if you did not, this is the kit we recommend.  The clear elbow, while gross, is needed so you can know when the tanks have stopped draining.  We also recommend getting another 10′ extension hose as well.  Many RV parks will have the sewer drain a bit too far for a single hose.